@

Multi-modal Remote Sensing System (MRSS) for Transportation Inspection and Monitoring

RESEARCH    TEAM    RESOURCES


Welcome to the MRSS project website!

Introduction: Managing the growing population of deteriorated transportation infrastructure systems (i.e. highway bridges) and being able to accurately inspect them in a timely and cost effective manner is a major societal challenge within the United States today. Traditional nondestructive testing/inspection/evaluation (NDT/NDI/ NDE) methods for highway bridges cannot currently provide an accurate and rapid evaluation (independent of human biases and interpretation) on a routine basis to prevent deteriorated bridges from sudden collapse. Figure 1 shows the sudden collapse of a highway bridge in Pittsburgh. Automated, low-cost, efficient bridge inspection techniques for interrogating critical bridge components are needed. Existing highway bridge inspection techniques include visual inspection, mechanical sounding, rebound hammer, cover meter, electrical potential measurements, and ultrasound which are typically time consuming, labor intensive, and cost inefficient. Safety issue, interference with existing traffic, and subjective evaluation of visual inspection are additional disadvantages in such inspections. 

Figure 1.  Collapsed I-70 Lake View Drive Bridge, Pittsburgh, PA

The objective of this project is to develop a multi-modal remote sensing system (MRSS) that will be used as the next generation of rapid, distant, interrogation technology for bridge inspection.  The proposed MRSS combines advantages of NDT (local inspection) and structural health monitoring (SHM) (global, continuous monitoring), using innovative continuous wave imaging radar (CWIR), digital image correlation (DIC), and fiber optic sensors (FOS) to deliver a cost-effective, robust solution for the inspection and monitoring of critical transportation infrastructure such as highway bridges. MRSS represents the next-generation of portable bridge inspection technology for efficient inspection, evaluation and rating of bridges.

Concept: In the proposed MRSS technology, remotely sensed and reconstructed radar (CWIR) and optical (DIC) images provide an efficient interpretation of the spatial information of the structure under test, while the FOS component provides physical measurements on the structure. While CWIR can penetrate into the surface of structures to perform subsurface sensing, it will sacrifice resolution if the inspection area is too large. Also, CWIR interrogates structures by their electromagnetic properties which are not as detailed as the optical images taken by a high-resolution camera. The use of DIC will help CWIR to see "better", while the use of CWIR will help DIC to see "deeper". On the other hand, The use of FOS in MRSS is to provide continuous physical measurements for i) relating locally-collected radar and optical images to the global behavior of the structure (measured by FOS) in space, and ii) interpreting instant radar and optical images (snapshots) over time. Figure 2 shows the inspection scheme of the MRSS technology. Figure 3 shows the integration scheme of various MRSS techniques.

Figure 2.  Inspection and monitoring scheme of the MRSS technology

Figure 3.  Integration scheme of various MRSS techniques

Federal sponsor: The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Research and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA) Commercial Remote Sensing & Spatial Information (CRS&SI) Program Phase III (Program Manager: Mr. Caesar Singh)

Research joint venture: The University of Massachusetts Lowell (UMass Lowell) (lead organization), the University of Illinois Chicago (UIC), Trilion Quality Systems (Trilion), LR Technologies (LR Tech), and HNTB Corporation.

Contact us:

Prof. Tzu-yang Yu
Civil and Environmental Eng
UMass Lowell
FA107B, One University Avenue,
Lowell, MA 01854-2827

Email: Tzuyang_Yu@UML.EDU       (Office) (978) 934-2288     (Fax) (978) 934-3052

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@


© 2011-2012 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

The University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@